Show Review // Andres Gomez

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As I’m typing this, my neck still hurts from seeing GØGGS play at The Echo on March 17th, St. Patricks Day. For those who are not familiar with Ty Segall and any of his affiliated bands, if you go to a Ty Segall show, expect absolute chaos, prepare to be mind-blown, and don’t be surprised if your neck is sore from irresistibly head-banging too much to the face-melting songs and performance by Ty and the band he is apart of. To say the least, it still hurts to look over my shoulder when I want to make a lane change while driving.

 

The opening bands were fantastic, Naked Lights, a no-wave punk from Oakland ruled. Warm Drag, an interesting duo that consists of the drummer of !!! and now Thee Oh Sees , Paul Quattrone, and member of Golden Triangle, Vashti Windish, put on a interesting show as Quattrone performed the sounds of a full band all from a sampler and a few pedals while Winish delivered vocals on top . He sampled everything from guitar, bass, drums, and noise which as a whole sounds like a whole band but is all performed by one guy, which I found impressive. Overall, Warm Drag delivers their music in a super original way and were really awesome to watch. Flat Worms, a punk band that consists of members from Thee Oh Sees and Kevin Morby, also ripped.

 

And finally, after months of not playing since their first and only two shows in Los Angeles last summer, GØGGS took the stage after much anticipation and began to set up their gear. After setting up, the members left the stage except for Segall who turned on his pedals and left his guitar leaning against his full stack of amplifiers while bassist Michael Anderson did the same. For two to three minutes, there was nobody on stage and all the crowd could hear was the noisey feedback coming from three amplifiers penetrate their ears, leaving people even more excited for GØGGS to perform or to secretly cover their ears from the extremely loud drone noise coming from the stage. After what seemed like ages, GØGGS took the stage to begin their set and Segall opened up with the opening riff to “Falling In”, the first track of their self-titled record. Within the first 30 seconds, Anderson and Charles Moothart joined in on bass and drums, and suddenly, the song exploded into the main riff, causing the crowd to erupt into a full blown pit. I didn’t even have intentions on joining but with 250 watts of noise coming from Segall’s amplifiers, Moothart pounding on the skins, Anderson’s thunderous bass skills, and Chris Shaw’s vocals in the face of the crowd, it was too irresistible to not join considering the loud, powerful, and intense output being produced by GØGGS that left nobody at least bobbing their head. As vocalist Chris Shaw delivered his direct vocals at the crowd, the crowd, now having listened to the record for months, sung the lyrics along with Shaw at the top of their lungs. For the rest of the show, people were slamming and going nuts while GØGGS blasted through their record with hard-hitters such as “Shotgun Shooter”, “Smoke the Wurm,” “Needle Trade Off,” ,”Know Your Name,” and even a new song. I also enjoyed the fact that Charles Moothart and Ty Segall switched back and forth between drums and guitar for a few songs, making it even more captivating and mind-blowing. The band ended their set with “Glendale Junkyard,” the last song on their record, a hard-hitter, and left the stage. After a brief few minutes of recovering and catching my breath, the band rejoined the stage and ended the night with a Germs cover of ,”Circle One,” which perfectly ended the night. Afterwards my ears were dead and at the time I could only imagine the neck pain that was coming the next week. With the addition of a new song in their set, we can conclude that GØGGS isn’t going anywhere, especially with Chris Shaw moving from Memphis to Los Angeles. If you get the chance to see GØGGS, don’t sleep on it, figure it out, I guarantee you won’t be disappointed.

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